February 17th, 2021:(CONSULTING SERVICES – FIRM SELECTION)

Assignment Title: Hiring of Consultant to Develop Field Manuals and Procedures for the Liberia Land Authority, under the Liberia Land Administration Project.

Reference No.: LR-LLA-214602-CS-QCBS

In 2018, the LLA received a grant of US$7 million from the World Bank to strengthen the institutional capacity of the Liberia Land Authority (LLA) and establish a land administration system. The Liberia Land Administration Project (LLAP) was declared effective on March 22, 2018 and is expected to close October 31st, 2022. The project has four components namely: (1) Support to the Liberia Land Authority, (2) Piloting of Registration of Customary Land, (3) Development of a Land Administration System, and (4) Project Coordination, Monitoring and Evaluation.

The duration of the assignment is expected to last for 12 months after signing the contract.

The Liberia Land Authority now invites eligible Consulting Firms (“Consultant”) to indicate their interest in providing the Services. Interested Consulting Firms should provide information demonstrating that they have the required qualifications and relevant experience to perform the Services. The shortlisting criteria are listed below.

The Consulting Firm should have a minimum qualifications and experience as follows:

The firm will be specialized in land administration, land registration, land governance, and land tenure. The firm will have a minimum of 10 years of international experience in systematic land adjudication, formalization, and registration, with demonstrated experience of working on systematic and/or customary land issues in Africa. The firm’s team shall consist at a minimum of the following key experts. Other experts should be proposed by the team as relevant.

Key Experts will not be evaluated at the shortlisting stage.

The attention of interested Consultants is drawn to Section III, paragraphs, 3.14, 3.16, and 3.17 of the World Bank’s “Procurement Regulations for IPF Borrowers” July 1, 2016, Revised November 2017 and August 2018 (“Procurement Regulations”), setting forth the World Bank’s policy on conflict of interest. Consultants may associate with other firms to enhance their qualifications, but should indicate clearly whether the association is in the form of a joint venture and/or a sub-consultancy. In the case of a joint venture, all the partners in the joint venture shall be jointly and severally liable for the entire contract, if selected. The Consulting Firm will be selected in accordance with the Quality and Cost Based Selection (QCBS) method set out in the Procurement Regulations. Further information can be obtained at the address below during office hours, i.e. 0900 to 1600 hours GMT. Expressions of interest must be delivered in a written form to the address below (in person, or by mail, or by fax, or by e-mail) by Friday February 19, 2021:

“Re: Hiring of Consultant to Develop Field Manuals for the Liberia Land Authority, under the Liberia Land Administration Project. Liberia Land Administration Project (LLAP) Attn: Mr. Teakon J. Williams Project Coordinator Ministry of Commerce & Industry Former Building Ashmun Street Monrovia, Liberia Tel: +231770567334 E-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. Cc: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Terms of Reference

To provide technical assistance to the Liberia Land Authority for the implementation of Customary Land Rights Registration Pilot

1. Introduction The Liberia Land Authority (LLA) was established by an Act of the Legislature in October 2016. The LLA consolidates the land related functions previously performed by key land administration agencies, such as the Department of Lands, Survey and Cartography (DLSC) under the former Ministry of Lands, Mines and Energy, and the Deed and Title Registry of the Center for National Document Record Agency (CNDRA). Based on relevant provisions of the LLA Act, the LLA has now assumed responsibility for providing a range of land related services to the public in order to generate revenues both for LLA’s operations and placement in the consolidated account of the Government.

In 2018, the LLA received a grant of US$7 million from the World Bank to strengthen the institutional capacity of the Liberia Land Authority (LLA) and establish a land administration system. The Liberia Land Administration Project (LLAP) was declared effective on March 22, 2018 and is expected to close October 31st, 2022. The project has four components namely: (1) Support to the Liberia Land Authority, (2) Piloting of registration of customary land, (3) Development of a Land Administration System, and (4) Project Coordination, Monitoring and Evaluation. Component 2 was introduced after the passage of the 2018 Land Rights Act, which calls for the registration of customary land.

Several stakeholders have carried out a series of projects related to the registration of customary land. The lessons learned from Community Self Identification (CSI) processes and related projects (carried out mostly by local Civil Society Organizations with support of donors such as the USAID-funded Land Governance Support Activity – LGSA; the International Land and Forest Tenure Facility - TF; the European Union; and others) need to be further complemented to articulate a systematic process to complete the determination of all land rights and interests existing in pre-defined areas (either counties or smaller intervention areas). LLA has collaborated with CSOs that have been involved in many pilots by verifying the processes, but has never implemented any required steps with in-house staff, reducing LLA’s capacity to adequately conduct quality control of customary land registration processes and is not fully able to register customary land itself. In addition, the LLA requires adequate capacity to finalize ongoing Customary Land registration. Finally, some of the steps required by the Land Rights Act in relation to registration of customary land were not yet piloted, i.e. the identification and validation of tribal certificates and private land deeds within customary communities’ boundaries. While there is no decision yet on whether these steps are mandatory for providing a deed to a community, the experiences will benefit LLA to inform the most efficient implementation of these steps, independent of their time of implementation.

The LLA specifically seeks to implement this activity in four communities that will be identified in four counties. Two of these communities will be piloted using all the steps, commencing from the Community Self-Identification (CSI) to issuing a Statutory Land Deed, while the other two communities will be commencing from where partners started but did not finalize the process. The LLA will verify steps completed by partners for the latter two communities. The LLA will continue to work with these communities to complete the remaining steps that will lead to the registration of their community lands. It is anticipated that this work will enable LLA to better define roles and responsibilities of involved stakeholders and define adequate processes and mechanisms in this regard. As some of the steps were not yet piloted, several risks were identified that need adequate safeguards measures to mitigate any potential risks. A key concern is related to tribal certificates, which have been used since the 1950s by communities and community members to secure their land rights, but they have also been misused by local elites to extract customary land for private gains without communities’ consent. Hence, the validation and conversion of existing tribal certificates to private deeds needs to be handled with utmost caution to avoid legitimizing false claims. Hence, consultation with communities is fundamental to mitigate risks. Another potential risk is the provision of the Land Rights Act that foresees that communities should identify up to 10% of their land as public land. The provision allows for communities not to allocate any land as public land and they need to be thoroughly informed about this option as well as the consequences (positive and negative) of defining parts of their land as public land. All activities in this regard need to be voluntary and based on community consensus. No land shall be identified as public land when community members or other legitimate land rights holders claim such land and respective implementation processes need to be developed. To adequately implement this activity, the LLA intends to use its staff from the Customary Land Rights Unit. LLA has also identified staff from other LLA departments to join the unit for this exercise. However, since this is the first time LLA will conduct these activities in-house, the LLA seeks the services of an experienced firm to help with developing pilot implementation field manuals as well as safeguards documents as required by the World Bank, as well as a scale-up strategy and plan based on the results of this activity and experiences from other partners.

2. Objective of the Assignment

The objective of the assignment is to provide technical assistance to the Liberia Land Authority to develop pilot implementation field manuals for implementing and piloting the registration of customary land rights, develop the related safeguards documents as required by the World Bank, and prepare a scale-up strategy/plan based on the implementation experiences.

The specific objectives are to:

• Support LLA in the preparatory activities to execute the pilots on systematic registration of customary land in four counties; • Based on the Land Rights Policy of 2013, the Land Rights Act of 2018, relevant regulations , procedures, tools, etc. develop a pilot implementation field manual for facilitating Customary Land registration; • Prepare related safeguards documents and mainstream safeguards measures in the field manual prior to the commencement of any field work: • Support LLA during the execution of the pilots by providing technical assistance and assist LLA with analysis of pilot findings; • Support LLA with the identification of practice areas (i.e. survey and mapping, land adjudication and registration, community participation, conflict resolution, gender inclusiveness, digital field data collection, among others) requiring further definitions; and • Assist LLA with identification of new areas to continue the systematic land registration process, based on clearly defined criteria (considering existing pilots/activities that are being implemented/planned by other stakeholders) as part of a scale-up strategy/plan, which the firm will assist to develop.

3. Scope of Service

The work to be carried out by the firm includes:

• Conduct desk work to review relevant policies, laws, strategies, research articles, and any other relevant documentation related to the registration of customary land rights, including project and consultants reports from land administration related initiatives, such as ongoing and previous World Bank funded interventions, the USAID-funded Land Governance Support Activity and the SIDA funded Tribal Certificates Pilots, the SIDA funded Urban Land Inventory projects, the Integrated Land Administration Project, the Tenure Facility initiative for Community Self Identification Projects, the European Union funded Land Rights in Liberia Project, the United Nations Sustaining Peace and Reconciliation through Strengthening Land Governance and Dispute Resolution Mechanisms Project; as well as Civil Society Initiatives as implemented by members of the Civil Society Working Group on Land Rights Reform and other stakeholders; • Conduct on-site interviews and meetings in Liberia with LLA senior Management (Chairperson, Vice Chairperson, Board of Commissioners, and Executive Director) as well as LLA technical staff and external public and private stakeholders involved in the land sector, including Civil Society Organizations, development partners as well as potential community beneficiaries; • Assist LLA with compilation and systematization of the existing official information for the areas of intervention, including maps, property registry records, land use planning instruments, administrative data on Tribal Certificates, administrative data on environmental restrictions, concessions for natural resources and other official information relevant for the titling process; • Assist LLA with Compilation and systematization of the information produced by CSOs in the recent years for the Community Self-Identification and land registration pilot projects; • With support and participation from LLA, prepare a draft field manual for a systematic and cost-effective determination of customary land rights for the four pilot areas defined by LLA, inclusive of the approved Community Self-Identification Guide, and other processes and approaches such as the establishment of Community Land Development and Management Committees, participatory mapping and boundary harmonization, identification and registration of Customary Land Rights in a methodical, gender-sensitive, and cost-effective manner in line with the Liberia Land Rights Act and based on existing pilot experiences from the LLA, Civil Society Organizations, and other development partners. For technical aspects requiring further work, the firm will identify the knowledge gaps and prepare work plans and estimation of resources required to complete them (see Annex 3 for proposed content of the field manual); • With participation from LLA, design a mechanism to carry out independent quality control of the field activities, both regarding the technical and the financial aspects of the operation; • With participation from LLA, adapt existing open source field data collection tools (where possible based on tools adopted to the Liberia context) to gather geographical parcel information and claimant information and ensure that field data feeds into LLA’s central database system; • With LLA, review and/or develop transparent, gender-sensitive, and participatory methodologies for the verification of tribal certificates; identification and verification of private deeds in communities; and identification of up to 10% of public land as part of the identification of land claims within customary land, consistent with World Bank safeguards policies such as OP 4.12. (Involuntary Resettlement); • In line with the pilot design, prepare in collaboration with the LLA required safeguards documents: o Mainstream gender and women’s land rights issues in the field manual; o Prepare a new Stakeholder Engagement Plan; o Prepare mitigation plan to identify risks and mitigation measures; and o Update existing Grievance Redress Mechanism Framework, incl. a CSO observatory mechanism; • Estimate financial and human resource requirements for the activities related to the pilot activities as well as implementation of safeguards measures; • Prepare/revise existing training material and support the training of LLA field staff and relevant stakeholders in use of field work manual, e.g. regarding technology, safeguards measures, women’s land rights, etc.; • Backstop field work and conduct quality control of field work with LLA and resolve any issues that may occur during implementation by preparing progress reports of the pilot implementation, including adjustments made to the work plans, actual usage of staff, equipment and other resources, observations of the main obstacles identified, and decisions made to address them; • Analyze pilot findings regarding time, financial resources used, experience with capacities, community feedback, quality of data, data flows, etc. to provide recommendations for the required adjustments to the detailed manuals based on the challenges faced and lessons learned during implementation; a. Prepare scale-up strategy and plan based on the pilot results and analysis, considering feasibility, pros and cons, costs and benefits of modes of implementation alternative to registering customary land directly executed by LLA and definition of roles of various stakeholders, including Civil Society Organizations; • Assess the current technical regulations and practices for parcel demarcation and mapping required for customary land registration (incl. accuracy standards, procedural requirements, etc.) and based on the analysis of costs and local capacities to comply with them, support LLA in the production of cost-effective technical regulations; and • Organize workshops to discuss and present findings with LLA and other stakeholders.

4. Reporting Requirements

The firm will report to the Director of Land Administration on technical matters but will liaise with technical staff in the Departments of Land Administration, Land Use & Management and Land Policy and Planning, the Executive Director, relevant Commissioners, and the Project Coordinator of the LLAP Project Implementation Unit on administrative matters.

5. Deliverables

The firm is required to deliver the following:

a) Inception Report, including a timeline of activities; b) Systemized preparatory information, consisting of relevant official and other available data (maps, deeds, Tribal Certificates, concessions, CLDMC documents, etc.). The product includes a report describing the type of information, the source and physical location, the conditions of the analogue or digital documentation, and the way it has been organized. For the information available in digital format, the product will be delivered in a basic database; c) Stakeholder engagement strategy per World Bank safeguards requirements; d) Updated project Grievance Redress Mechanism Framework; e) Mitigation plan, identifying key safeguards risks and mitigation measures; f) Draft field manual and final field manual, incl. presentation of final version with LLA to other stakeholders; g) Adopted open source digital field data collection tool for geographical and textual information, linked to LLA’s central database system (if feasible, based on already tested solutions employed by other actors); h) Training materials for training of LLA field staff and other stakeholders; i) Draft and final scale-up strategy, incl. criteria for prioritization of implementation areas, implementation models, roles and responsibilities of stakeholders, etc., and scale-up plan (incl. financial and human resource requirements), and presentation of strategy and plan with LLA to all relevant stakeholders; j) Assessment of existing technical regulations and practices applicable for customary land registration and proposal for improvements, incl. for cost-effective technical regulations for demarcation of customary land parcels; and k) Monthly progress reports.

6. Duration of Assignment

The duration of the assignment is expected to last for 12 months after signing the contract. A more detailed timeline will be submitted as part of the firm’s technical proposal and inception report.

7. Qualifications and Experience

The firm will be specialized in land administration, land registration, land governance, and land tenure. The firm will have a minimum of 10 years of international experience in systematic land adjudication, formalization, and registration, with demonstrated experience of working on systematic and/or customary land issues in Africa. The firm’s team shall consist at a minimum of the following key experts. Other experts should be proposed by the team as relevant.

Team leader and systematic land registration expert with the following qualifications:

• Master’s degree in land administration; land management; land economics; land law; land surveying; geography; or related fields; • A minimum of 10 years’ international experience with working on customary land rights registration and/or systematic land registration activities; • At least 5 years of working in similar assignments in the Africa region, specifically with experience of managing diverse inter-disciplinary teams, designing pilots /field manuals for the registration of customary land; • Good knowledge of dynamics in the land sector in the Africa region with knowledge of land issues in anglophone West Africa, particularly Liberia being an advantage; • Good knowledge of conflict prevention and management; and sensitive in employing conflict mitigation mechanism in communities prone to conflict and • Experience with planning and preparing budgets and human resources requirements, and field team management for similar activities and related quality control mechanisms.

Social safeguards and gender specialist:

• Bachelor or Master’s degree in sociology, social development, gender studies, land administration; or related fields; • A minimum of 5 years’ national or international experience with working on women’ land rights, vulnerable groups, customary land rights and/or land registration activities; • At least 3 years of working in similar assignments in the Africa region, specifically with registering women’s land rights, communication with customary communities, land dispute resolution, etc.; • Good knowledge of dynamics in the land sector in the Africa region with knowledge of land issues in anglophone West Africa, particularly Liberia being an advantage; • Experience with safeguards requirements and preparation of related documents in line with World Bank operational policies and documents (e.g. Environmental Assessment (OP 4.01), Environmental and Social Management Frameworks, Stakeholder Engagement Plans; etc.); • Experience with working with diverse groups of people, including government actors, civil society, and development partners; and • Excellent oral and writing skills in English.

Land Surveying Specialist

• Bachelor or Master’s degree in surveying, geomatics, geodesy or related field; • A minimum of 5 years’ international experience with working on land surveying and land registration activities; • At least 3 years of working in similar assignments in the Africa region, specifically with registering customary land rights and familiarity with use of mobile devices for participatory demarcation of boundaries; • Good knowledge of dynamics in the land sector in the Africa region with knowledge of land issues in anglophone West Africa, particularly Liberia being an advantage; • Knowledge and experience with adopting and implementing fit-for-purpose surveying approaches suitable to local contexts; • Experience with working with diverse groups of people, including government actors, civil society, and development partners; and • Excellent oral and writing skills in English.

ICT Specialist

• Bachelor or Master’s degree in information technology, computer science, or related technical field; • A minimum of 5 years’ international experience with digital field data collection and land information systems (both theory and practice); • At least 3 years of working in similar assignments in the Africa region, specifically with registering customary land rights and familiarity with use of mobile devices for participatory demarcation of boundaries and collection of landowner information; • Programming skills and experience in adapting relevant open source solutions for mobile data collection and designing data models to link field data to LLA’s ICT system at the headquarter level; • Good knowledge of dynamics in the land sector in the Africa region with knowledge of land issues in anglophone West Africa, particularly Liberia being an advantage; • Experience with working with diverse groups of people, including government actors, civil society, and development partners; and • Excellent oral and writing skills in English.

8. Facilities to be provided by the LLA

The Liberia Land Authority, the implementing agency of the project, will make available to the firm all documents that are relevant to the assignment and will establish a working group to facilitate the work of the firm, provide feedback to the proposals and assess the deliverables presented by the firm within no more than two calendar weeks after these are submitted. At least two key technical counterparts will be assigned by LLA to work closely with the firm to ensure knowledge transfer. The LLA will also be responsible to engage the Liberian government actors, CSOs and private sector individuals and organizations relevant for the execution of the services. The firm is expected to stay for the contract period of 12 months, in Monrovia, Liberia to provide hands-on technical assistance to the Liberia Land Authority. Costs for flights and accommodation will be paid by the LLA but the required arrangements need to be made by the firm. The firm will work from the LLA’s offices in Monrovia where office space will be made available for the duration of this assignment. Any required field trips (e.g. visit of county land offices or potential beneficiary communities) will be facilitated by the LLA.

Annex 1

Recommendations presented to LLA regarding the issues to be developed for the piloting of methodic determination of CLR

1. The piloting activities under Component 2 will be used to test different tools and approaches to the technical issues LLA will have to face to effectively address the challenges of systematic registration of CLR. Noteworthy, the main purpose of the pilots will be to experiment different approaches and methods, accumulate real experience through trial and error (where controlled fails can be allowed as investments to obtain evidence to inform policy decisions). It is expected that during the piloting a rigorous, detailed reporting and accounting effort of cost and duration of the outcomes will be implemented. With this information LLA will be able to update and enrich its draft “National Guide for Formalization of Customary Land Rights” to include flexible procedures to accommodate the variety of tenure situations in a cost-effective manner. The pilots to be implemented under Component 2 will therefore serve the following objectives:

a) Test methods for the identification of communities and the tools for establishing their governance structures. During the recent past years, valuable experience has been accumulated by Civil Society Organizations working in projects for community self-identification and establishment of their governance structures. LGSA and the Tenure Facility will continue financing these initiatives during 2020. It is therefore expected that a systematization of these experiences may inform the design of innovative, alternative methods to speed up the processes while maintaining the quality and legitimacy of the results. Implications for the design of pilots: coordinate with LGSA, Tenure Facility, and CSOs a series of working sessions to examine the lessons learned from the CSI and CLDMC establishment experiences. Emphasis should be given to the mechanisms to speed up the processes, possibly by compressing activities or delegating some tasks where capacities at the community level were available. b) Test methods for compiling existing interests in land within communities. The systematic registration of CLR involves the determination of the existing deeds, concessions, tribal certificates and other valid claims within communities. However, the registration and securing of a community’s right is the primary objective and all tribal certificates and private deeds discovered in a community will require participatory and transparent validation processes by community members (see more below under point c)). Implication for the design of pilots: Identify areas where deeds, concessions and other claims have been organized. Alternatively, carry out a short - focalized compilation and digitization exercise recording the cost and time investment. Pilot the current model of compilation of claims in the field, separately from an alternative model including a “preparatory phase” where compilation of claims is produced in advance and complemented during field activities. c) Develop and test detailed rules, instructions and formats for the validation of tribal certificates and other tenure rights by the community. The Land Rights Act (LRA) (art. 47) prescribes that the tribal certificate validation process is led by LLA with involvement of the community. There are several questions that need to be addressed, such as What are the requirements of form and content for a valid tribal certificate? Who are valid certificate holders (only the tribal certificate holder, or also heirs and transferees)? What is considered "developed" and "undeveloped" land under tribal certificate? A different issue is the existence of legitimate but undocumented tenure transactions within the communities, for example land made available for churches or small-scale agriculture undertakings. Responses to these questions need to harmonize the legal provisions with the customary practices, and the conclusions should be incorporated in formats and specific activities during the systematic registration. Implication for the design of pilots: Based on experience from previous tribal certificate validation exercises (from both LLA vetting teams experience and others), LLA need to develop a detailed guide, instructions and format and test them during pilots. Also, LLA needs to consider rules for the recognition of legitimate, undocumented occupation over land claimed by tribal certificates, and rules for the recognition of informal legitimate rights without tribal certificates. d) Test technical methods for community boundaries harmonization, surveying and mapping. The Confirmatory Survey of the customary land boundaries established in the LRA (art. 37) is mentioned in the draft “National Guide for the Formalization of Customary Land Rights …” (Phase 5: Conducting Confirmatory Survey), as the technical activity of demarcation by which the LLA survey team perform the technical measurements on the boundaries marked by the community. Different approaches (general boundaries or fixed boundaries) can be used depending on the country’s policy options. Also, different survey methods could be used, from complete indirect methods (identifying the polygon on a geo-referenced orthorectified image) to more or less cost intensive field work with support of geo-positioning devices of varied levels of accuracy. The best method is not the most technically advanced or capable of providing more accuracy measurements, but the method which is more in line with the existing resources (time and money) and capabilities to complete the nation-wide confirmatory survey ordered by the LRA and sustain the results in the long term. Implications for the design of pilots: it is recommendable to pilot different approaches and methods for surveying: i) the outer boundaries of communities; ii) the demarcation of validated tribal certificates, iii) the demarcation of existing deeds and concessions if these do not have appropriate descriptions. e) Test the response capacity from the tribal certificate probation officers and deeds registration offices. The draft “National Guide for the formalization of Customary Land Rights …” includes in Phase 6: Registration of land documents, a step 6.1. by which the CLDMC has to take action to probate the title with the Probate Officer at the LLA or at the Circuit Court of the County. However, it appears that LLA does not have the statutory backing to probate deeds, leading to questions of the most efficient approach in this regard and leads to other questions: Is it really necessary that the probation of the CL deed was made by a (most probably poor) community?; Which of the two options (LLA probate officer or County Circuit Court) is more cost-effective and/or legally possible; What are the capabilities (human, financial, logistic) that need to be in place to complete this task in a large scale-systematic effort? These questions need clear and well documented responses from LLA to face a nation-wide effort. Implications for the design of pilots: It is recommendable to pilot a mechanism by which as part of the systematic and proactive process, the deed is automatically sent to LLA probate officer without additional intervention. The level of effort required to deliver the deed for probation and the level of effort and time required for the probation process need to be tested in a real life experience, for communities regarding customary lands and also for holders of tribal certificates. f) Test real responses from end users and communities to different cost recovery measures. The draft “National Guide for the Formalization of Customary Land Rights …” describes in Phase 6: Registration of Land Documents, that “the activities under this phase shall be the sole exclusive responsibility of the community through the CLDMC”, implying that the probation fee and the registration fee need to be paid by the communities. It is understandable that a cost recovery scheme is necessary to assure the financial sustainability, however, international successful systematic land registration experiences usually eliminate all transaction cost for communities to eliminate barriers and assure that they complete the process. However, it would be advisable to test reasonable cost recovery mechanisms for the case of subsequent transactions. Implications for the design of pilots: Depending on available resources, pilot different cost recovery models, from no initial fee, to low and medium fees and test for their acceptance by communities and individuals.

Annex 2:

Recommendations regarding LLA’s draft “National Guide for Formalization of Customary Land Rights”.

1. LLA’s draft “National Guide for Systematic Titling of Customary Land” is a good starting point to estimate the level of effort and resources required to carry out the systematic registration of CL. The guide will have to be adjusted according to the new insights obtained from the experiences gained directly by LLA and by initiatives such as LGSA, Tenure Facility and others. It is recommendable that new versions of the “National Guide for Formalization of Customary Land Rights …” address the following issues. 2. Consider a Preparatory Stage for systematic processes. The current version of the draft “National Guide for Formalization of Customary Land Rights …” assumes that most of the information is to be collected in the field and makes no reference to previously compiled information which may simplify the field work. A systematic process will benefit from an information base to estimate the level of effort and resources required to address the work efficiently. It is recommendable that the process considers a preparatory stage to gather a base of information. For instance, the 2008 LISGS census may provide a good basis of information to estimate (with the support of the experiences from CSI experiences) the number of customary communities in each region. Other relevant base of information is the existing records of available deeds, concessions and other registered data. 3. Develop strategy and materials for awareness creation. Experience gathered from CSI projects has allowed LLA to produce the “Community Self-Identification Guide CSI” which describes the sequence of steps equivalent to Phases 1 and 2 of the draft “National Guide for Formalization of Customary Land Rights …”. This same base of experience can be used to systematize the lessons learned regarding the most effective mechanisms to raise awareness. A communications strategy defining the main communication channels and mechanisms, the main contents of the messaging, etc. and the specific materials (flyers, radio spots, etc.) can be designed in advance to be refined during the pilot projects. 4. Consider using varied tools for data capturing: analog or digital / mobile solutions. International experience in systematic registration shows the advantages of using mobile solutions to speed up field work, reduce digitization errors and improve quality control and management of field operations. A comparison between the costs and results from analog tools (written forms) and mobile solutions would provide very relevant information. 5. Include differentiated appropriate mechanisms for demarcation of objects of rights. Phase 5: Conducting Confirmatory Survey makes reference to the role of LLA in performing confirmatory surveys of all land including TC and the “delineation of all claims”. It is recommendable that detailed instructions be prepared to address the different objects of rights to be demarcated: i) the outer boundaries of communities; ii) the boundaries of validated tribal certificates, iii) the existing deeds and concessions if these do not have appropriate descriptions. 6. Consider compressing Boundary Harmonization and Conducting Confirmatory Survey in one stage instead of separating them. 7. Boundary marker: one source of boundary conflict has been the challenge associated with identifying boundary marker, which demarcate the boundary between communities. Predominantly, customary communities have used natural features (tree, hill, mountain, river, stream, etc.) to identify their boundaries with their neighbors. During the pilot, it will be determined how to address the issue of boundary marker by employing practical approach that will minimize the issue of boundary identification between communities

Annex 3: Proposed Field Manual content

The following field manual content is a preliminary draft based on preliminary discussions and has the objective to outline the general expectations regarding the content of the field manual. The content is subject to review and revisions of the firm and LLA. The final structure and content will be determined by LLA and the firm.

Table of contents Acronyms and abbreviations Glossary and definition of terms Version Control (a table showing the Manual’s version number, date, author and status (changes with respect to previous versions)

1. Part 1: Background for Registration of Customary Land Rights in Liberia 1.1. Introduction 1.2. Objective of field manual 1.3. Lessons learned from previous/ongoing interventions (description of different initiatives and summary of lessons learned by topic) 1.4. Issues and challenges identified (practice areas requiring further work)

2. Part 2: Policy and legal framework for Registration of Customary Land Rights 2.1. Policy framework 2.2. Legal framework 2.3. Institutional arrangement 2.4. National level actors (incl. table describing roles) 2.5. Sub-National level actors, including public agencies, private actors and community organizations (incl. table describing roles)

3. Part 3: Pilot Approach 3.1. Systematic, gender-sensitive, and cost-effective approach for registration of customary land rights (narrative description of the approach and principles to be applied) 3.2. Operational model: direct implementation by LLA and role of Technical Assistance 3.3. Use of technology (available mapping infrastructure, databases, communications technology, potential use of handheld devices, etc.)

4. Part 4: Preparatory activities 4.1. Compilation of available official data 4.2. Identification of pilot areas 4.3. Other preparatory activities (related to involvement of national / sub-national agencies, donor initiatives, CSOs, etc.)

5. Part 5: Process description (Describe phase, steps, activities specifying: 5.1. Objective of each phases and steps, description of each activity • Phase 1. • Phase 2. • Phase 3. • … 5.2. Actors responsible for activities in each phase/step (including LLA, local authorities, consultants, community members, CSOs, etc.) 5.3. Inputs required for each phase (for example: documentation, data base, official approval, etc.) 5.4. Outputs produced for each phase 5.5. Estimated duration for implementing each phase/step 5.6. Description of safeguards implications/requirements per each phase

6. Part 6: Monitoring and evaluation 6.1. Data collection (established as part of day to day activities) 6.2. M&E data analysis 6.3. Reporting template and data collection forms

7. Part 7: Civil Society Organizations (CSO) support 7.1. Introduction 7.2. Roles of CSOs during implementation

8. Part 8: Resources required for piloting registration of customary land rights 8.1. Description of positions, roles and responsibilities 8.2. Number of persons for each position, profile for each position; estimation of costs 8.3. Equipment; estimation of costs 8.4. Transportation; estimation of costs 8.5. Information and communications; estimation of costs

 

Reported By: Emmanuel Chedeh Davis - Communications and Outreach Officer

 

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  • Leadership of the Liberia Land Authority
H.E. Dr. George Manneh Weah

H.E. Dr. George Manneh Weah
President of the Republic of Liberia


Hon. Chief Dr. Jewel Howard Taylor

Hon. Chief Dr. Jewel Howard-Taylor
Vice President of the Republic of Liberia


Atty. J. Adams Manobah

Atty. J. Adams Manobah
Chairman - Liberia Land Authority


Hon. P. Bloh Sayeh

Hon. P. Bloh Sayeh
Vice Chair - Liberia Land Authority


Hon. Ellen O. Pratt

Hon. Ellen O. Pratt
Commissioner - Liberia Land Authority


Hon. J. Josephus Burgess, Sr.

Hon. J. Josephus Burgess, Sr.
Commissioner - Liberia Land Authority


Hon. Kula L. Jackson

Hon. Kula L. Jackson
Commissioner - Liberia Land Authority


Mr. Stanley N. Toe

Mr. Stanley N. Toe
Executive Director - Liberia Land Authority

Contact Information

    • Former Commerce Building,
      Ashmun and Gurley Streets Intersection, Monrovia, Liberia
    • +231 - 775 - 275 328 
      +231 - 886 - 528 792
    • This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Liberia Land Authority

The Liberia Land Authority (LLA) is a product of the policy, legal and institutional reform of the land sector of Liberia led by the erstwhile Land Commission. The LLA, established by an Act of the National Legislature on October 6, 2016, as an autonomous agency of the Government with operational independence, subsumes land functions that were performed by several agencies of government... Read details